Night Came wit Many Stars by Simon Van Booy 280 pages

In 1933 in Kentucky, Carol’s despicable father lost her in a card game when she was thirteen years old. Although her early years are filled with violence and anger, eventually she happens upon good people who help her through a terribly difficult time. Night Came with Many Stars tells Carol’s story as well as what happens to her children and grandchildren.

Some of this novel is harsh and heartbreaking, yet Night Came with Many Stars is also a work of hope, love and the strength of the human spirit. Van Booy’s eighth work of fiction presents a group of interesting, somewhat complex characters; however, I wish there was more detail and explanation about some of them.

Night Came wit Many Stars by Simon Van Booy 280 pages

Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line by Deepa Anappara 338 pages

When a classmate goes missing, Jai, the narrator of the novel, and his friends Faiz, a Muslim boy in a predominantly Hindu neighborhood and Pari, probably the smartest and most ambitious girl in Jai’s class, decide to investigate. As more children disappear from their poverty stricken neighborhood and there is no help from the police or political leaders, the trio decides it is up to them to find the victims and the perpetrators.

Deepa Anappara’s debut novel is not an easy read. It vividly describes the dire poverty in Jai’s community. Also, their are many foreign words interspersed throughout the work, but, fortunately, there is a glossary at the end. However, Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line is worth the effort. Jai and his two young friends are delightful, facing their dilemmas with humor and passion.

Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line by Deepa Anappara 338 pages

Olympus Texas by Stacey Swann 336 pages

The Briscoes are NOT a model family. Peter, the patriarch, has had two extramarital affairs, resulting in three children. His son March had an affair with his brother’s wife, and his third son is involved in a shooting that results in his sister’s boyfriend’s death. And as if that is not enough for the town of Olympus to gossip about, Peter’s wife is flirting with the visiting veterinarian.

Stacey Swann’s debut novel is entertaining at times, but for all the drama going on in Olympus Texas, I felt no sympathy for any of the Briscoes. Also, Swann goes back and forth in time, and instead of that clarifying major events, it makes most of the major predicaments even more confusing.

Olympus Texas by Stacey Swann 336 pages

Great Circle by Maggie Shipstead 589 pages

It is 1909 and Marian Graves and her twin brother, Jamie, are rescued from a sinking ship by their father. Their mother goes down with the ship, and after the rescue, they never see their father again. Living with their Uncle Wallace in Missoula, Montana, Jamie grows up to become an artist and Marian a somewhat famous airplane pilot. In 2015 her life is made into a movie, and the young actress who portrays her learns much about Marian as well as herself.

Great Circle is the kind of novel I thoroughly enjoy. It has great character development, an exciting, intriguing plot, historical relevance and Maggie Shipstead knows how to write.

Great Circle by Maggie Shipstead 589 pages

Whereabouts by Jhumpa Lahiri 157 pages

Whereabouts is much anticipated new novel by The Pulitzer Prize winning author. Lahiri wrote this short, many chaptered book in Italian and then translated it into English. The unnamed narrator is a single, forty-something women working in academia. As we roam with her around the unnamed city she lives and works in, the reader gets glimpses of her childhood, her day to day activities and the nameless people she encounters.

Jhumpa Lahiri is a wonderful writer who presents a very interesting character who describes herself in short snippets, leaving the reader wanting more details about her life, her thoughts and her opinions.

Whereabouts by Jhumpa Lahiri 157 pages

Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Family by Patrick Radden Keefe 442 pages

Keefe describes three generations of the Sackler family and how they acquired their wealth and held on to it. First generation brothers, Arthur, Mortimer and Raymond Sackler all became medical doctors, were visibly philanthropic, bought pharmaceutical companies and kept quiet about how they ran their businesses. The second generation gave the world oxycontin, lied about its addictive qualities, and used marketing tactics which, unbeknown to its users, encouraged addiction. The third generation of Sacklers continued down the same immoral path as their ancestors.

The more I read Empire of Pain, the angrier I got. Patrick Radden Keefe writes an easy to read narrative, where with every chapter, the reader hopes this corrupt family will receive just punishments.

Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Family by Patrick Radden Keefe 442 pages

Real Life by Brandon Taylor 327 pages

Shortlisted for The Man Booker Prize, Brandon Taylor’s debut novel, describes a weekend in the life of a man named Wallace. He is Black, gay, and working towards an advanced degree in biochemistry at a nearly all white Midwestern University. During this early fall weekend, Wallace interacts with friends and fellow chemistry students. These encounters include a sexual relationship with a “friend” who continually denies that he is gay. The weekend forces Wallace, a passive man,to look seriously at his life and where he should be headed.

There’s a lot going on in Real Life. Taylor touches on many contemporary issues while presenting his readers with a sympathetic, yet enigmatic, main character.

Real Life by Brandon Taylor 327 pages

Nomadland by Jessica Bruder 251 pages

A few weeks ago I saw the award-winning movie, Nomadland. I kept going back to the idea that here was a subculture of people around my age that I knew nothing about. I knew that Fern, the Frances McDormand character, was fictitious, but others in the movie were playing themselves, and I wanted to learn more about them and their lifestyle.

The book Nomadland did not disappoint me. Jessica Bruder lived among these “nomads” on and off for three years. Her work of nonfiction explains how this subculture evolved, how difficult it is both emotionally and physically to live this lifestyle, and the ingenuity and sense of community these modern day wanderers possess. Nomadland introduces its readers to a fascinating group of people and they way they live.

Nomadland by Jessica Bruder 251 pages

How Beautiful We Were by Imbolo Mbue 360 pages

Mbue’s second novel takes place in Africa in the village of Kosawa. Pexton, and American oil company, has been extracting oil in Kosawa which in turn pollutes the river and crops causing death to some of its residents, mostly children. When the Kosawans finally figure out what is happening to their tribal village, they try in their naive and unworldly way to fight the rich and powerful American corporation. Many villagers join the fight against greed and pollution, but the leader is Thula. She is a native who was educated in The United States, and gave up everything to return to her homeland to help her family and friends.

How Beautiful We Were is one of the saddest books I’ve read in a long time. Well-written with heroic and villainous characters, Mbue’s work of fiction describes a sense of hopelessness for the future.

How Beautiful We Were by Imbolo Mbue 360 pages

Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro 303 pages

Klara is an AF, an artificial friend who is purchased by Josie’s mother. Klara is caring, perceptive and tactful; the perfect companion for Josie who has an undisclosed illness. While protecting and trying to cure Josie, Klara meets some interesting characters who also care deeply for Josie.

Ishiguro is an author I admire, and if he had not written Klara and the Sun, I would have never picked it up. The subject doesn’t interest me at all, however, Ishaguro’s understated presentation peaked my interest, made Klara, even though she is not human, a sympathetic character, and supplied me with food for thought after finishing Klara and the Sun.

Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro 303 pages